September 7th, 2016
IMG_2305
Example showing a late iteration of Mondrian Me. The student already used white, blue, yellow, red and is ready to explore the fractional makeup of the total image.  See below for more screenshots.

 

What is a Mondrian? Who? When? Why?

Example of a painting by Mondrian to the right.
Piet Mondrian was a Dutch painter who lived from 1872 to 1944.  In his lifetime he created a large, diverse body of work, but he’s most famous for his grid paintings that used primary colors, like the one on the right.  
For our purposes, these paintings are a great opportunity to think about collage of blocks of color, and the fractional pieces that make up the whole.
IMG_2289

 

Lesson Plan

Introduction

Introduce Mondrian, his works, concepts of collage and how fractions are related.  Show examples of his paintings, it would be helpful for students to see a broad range of these works, even though they look similar on many levels.  (ie Paintings with lots of color, some with mostly white, small grids, large, etc.)

 

To do:

  1. Students will use a worksheet that provides instructions and guides them through a course of exploration.  
  2. A sample workflow is shown below in screenshots, and this is not provided to the students.
  3. Allow set amounts of time for each stage of the worksheet.

 

Sharing

With each lesson, spend some time allowing the students to share their work with the class. In this lesson, students can share their collages.

 

Wrapup

If necessary, have students label their iPads so they will be able to return to them for the next lessons.

 

What you need to get started

A set of iPads with the Fraction Mash app

 

Time Needed

Depending on how much time you want to spend on this project, anywhere from 1 class period (if students are already familiar with Fraction Mash) to 3 class periods.

 

Collaboration and Group Work

These lessons are designed for students to work individually, in pairs, or in groups.  Each student should do all the work on their own sheets, and the iPad should be shared across group members as equally as possible. 

We suggest that groups be no larger than four students.  Four or more students in a group will require extra attention to make sure that every group member is contributing equally.

 

Questions

1) Which color shows up the most in your first collage?  Why?  

2) Which color shows up the most in your masterpiece?  Why?

3) How did equations help to keep track of the fractional components?  

4) Describe how you found the fractional components of your classmate’s collage.

5) Solve the following three problems.

a)  

smaller-FM-Fraction-Problem-1

b)

smaller-FM-Fraction-Problem-2

c)

smaller-FM-Fraction-Problem-3

6) Choose one of the problems above and explain how it could be represented by a picture made with Fraction Mash?  (Hint: It could involve a re-mix.)  

7) How is the image you described in #6 like the images you made in this activity?

 

Sample Workflow (not provided to students)

 

Students start with a selfie, as seen below. Save these 5 colors to the camera roll so they will be easy to access in Fraction Mash.

IMG_2291 IMG_2295 IMG_2293 IMG_2292 IMG_2306

 

The first mashup using selfie and white. White is a good color to start with because it helps create a sort of blank slate.  Note that 25ths are used, students will keep track as they go.  
 IMG_2297

 

Second mashup adding blue, and using 50ths.  10 rows by 5 columns.
IMG_2298

 

3rd mashup, adding yellow. Again with 50ths, but this time it’s 5 rows by 10 columns.
IMG_2301

 

4th mashup
IMG_2303

 

5th mashup
IMG_2308

 

Final image
 IMG_2307

 

Post a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Big Idea

In this activity students will use Fraction Mash to create a piece of art that resembles a work by Piet Mondrian, a Dutch modern painter known for his abstract art work featuring vertical and horizontal lines.  As they build their masterpieces, keeping fractions in the mix, they will also use Algebraic equations to help keep track of the fractional components of each color, as well as their original selfies.  In the end, the class will take a gallery walk of everyone’s Mondrian self-portraits.

Learning Objectives

From this activity, students will be able to:

  • Create visual models of fractions and then recreate the models using different grids and denominators.
  • Visualize and analyze equivalent rational numbers that have different denominators.
  • Use a series of sums of fractions represented by visual models to create collages that will deepen their understanding of order of operations and fractions in general.

Device Strategies

If necessary, have students label their iPads so they will be able to return to them for the next lessons.

These lessons are designed for students to work individually, in pairs, or in groups.  Each student should do all the work on their own sheets, and the iPad should be shared across group members as equally as possible. 
We suggest that groups be no larger than four students.  Four or more students in a group will require extra attention to make sure that every group member is contributing equally.